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Top Foods To Cure What Ails You

What to Eat to Fend Off a Cold

White Button Mushrooms – Foodies rave about exotic mushroom types, but the common white button variety could be your key to a cold-free winter, suggests research from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. They contain polysaccharides, which activate natural killer cells that destroy cold- and flu-causing viruses, says Dayong Wu, PhD, a scientist at the center.

Salmon – Three ounces of salmon can supply nearly 800 IUs of vitamin D, close to the amount that some experts recommend you get each day. That’s a good defense against sniffles: Researchers at the University of Colorado Denver found that people with low levels of D had significantly more colds. Without enough of this crucial nutrient, your body can’t produce antimicrobial proteins called cathelicidins, which destroy bacteria and viruses, according to lead study author Adit Ginde, MD.

Sunflower Seeds – This healthy snack is packed with vitamin E, which has been shown to boost the activity level of the body’s infection-fighting T cells. That may be why scientists at the Center on Aging found that this nutrient lowers the risk of getting a cold by 20 percent.

Yogurt – People who ate two cups of yogurt a day for four months had four times the gamma interferon, a natural substance that fights viral and bacterial infections, than those who skipped the calcium-rich food, a University of California Davis School of Medicine study reveals. The key: Choosing yogurt with live active cultures.

What to Eat to Beat Stress

Shrimp – Omega-3 fatty acids in shellfish may boost your mood by reducing stress hormones, like cortisol. People who ate three to four ounces a day lowered their risk of anxiety, depression, and stress by 30 percent, according to a study from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Spain.

Curry – The curcumin in turmeric — a spice in curry — lowers stress levels by inhibiting cortisol secretion, says a study conducted in China.

Milk – In a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, women who ate four or more servings of calcium a day had a 30 percent lower risk of PMS symptoms like anxiety and irritability.

Pistachios – Eating one and a half to three ounces of pistachios daily can lower blood pressure when you’re faced with a mental challenge by relaxing blood vessels, say researchers at Pennsylvania State University in University Park.

Red Bell Pepper – Vitamin C, which is abundant in these peppers, lowers stress by limiting cortisol production and stimulates the release of oxytocin, a feel-good chemical. When researchers at the University of Trier in Germany subjected people to the anxiety of public speaking, those who took 3,000 milligrams of C felt calmer and their blood pressure returned to normal faster than those who skipped C.

What to Eat to Soothe Stomach Pain

Yogurt –In a study at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who ate two 4.4-ounce servings of Activia yogurt daily for a month saw up to a 78 percent decrease in bloating. The yogurt contains probiotics — good bacteria that help restore normal stomach and intestinal functioning.

Fennel – Anethole, a substance in fennel leaves, seeds, and oil, is known to alleviate stomach cramping. It even helps colicky babies, says research from St. Petersburg Medical Academy of Postdoctoral Education in Russia.

Ginger – Studies show that this root quashes nausea from motion sickness, morning sickness, and even chemotherapy by 30 percent. This may be because ginger reduces inflammation in the stomach, according to study author Julie Ryan, PhD.

Peppermint Oil – Seventy-five percent of IBS patients had 50 percent fewer symptoms after taking two capsules containing 225 milligrams of peppermint oil twice a day for four weeks, say researchers at G. d’Annunzio University in Italy. The menthol in peppermint appears to soothe irritated intestinal muscles.

Raspberries – Fiber, which is found in oats, vegetables, and fruits like raspberries, was more effective than a placebo in taming symptoms of IBS, according to a review of studies at McMaster University in Canada.

Head Off Headaches

Snapper – The omega-3s in fish are great for your head. Almost 90 percent of people who got migraines reported fewer of the headaches after taking two grams of omega-3 concentrate daily, according to a Brown University School of Medicine study. “Fish and fish oil lower the production of a prostaglandin, a chemical that causes inflammation and pain,” says researcher Zeev Harel, MD.

Black Beans – Beans contain riboflavin, a nutrient that has been found to reduce the number of headache days by at least 50 percent in more than half of sufferers, say researchers at the University of Liege in Belgium.

Cayenne Pepper – The compound that gives cayenne its heat, capsaicin, can ease cluster headaches (which typically affect one side of the head and occur several days in a row), probably by destroying a chemical that carries pain messages to the brain. Although people who get cluster headaches often inhale capsaicin through a nasal spray, try adding cayenne to your cooking.

Quinoa – Magnesium, often deficient in migraine sufferers, is plentiful in this grain. “The mineral relaxes blood vessels and normalizes serotonin receptors,” explains Alexander Mauskop, MD, director of the New York Headache Center in New York City. In one German study, patients taking 600 milligrams of magnesium daily saw their headache frequency plummet by more than 40 percent.

Source:  http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/recipes/healthy-eating/superfoods/what-to-eat-to-cure-anything/?sssdmh=dm17.619475&esrc=nwfitdailytip092912

 

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Eat To Balance Your Hormones

The hormone leptin is released from your fat cells after you eat to tell your body to stop feeling hungry and start burning calories. So the more leptin the merrier, right? Not exactly. The more fat you have on your body, the more leptin you produce, and excess leptin can eventually cause your body to become resistant. If your body is resistant to leptin, the hormone can’t do its job. The goal is to optimize your leptin levels by choosing foods that work to increase your body’s sensitivity to leptin and strategically raise levels of it when necessary. Here are a few of the nutrients you should look for.

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA): This type of omega-3 fatty acid stimulates leptin production by increasing the metabolism of glucose. It’s found in cold-water fish, such as wild salmon, mackerel, sardines, and herring. (Farm-raised fish are not a great source of EPA or other omega-3s because their diet makes them produce more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3s. Omega-6 fatty acids encourage inflammation and can counter the healthful effects of omega-3s.) Other types of omega-3s can cause a temporary dip in leptin levels, which can help you kick-start a sluggish metabolism.

Protein: One study found that increasing protein to 30 percent of total daily calorie intake improved participants’ leptin sensitivity, which resulted in overall lowered calorie intake. Good sources of protein include yogurt, Pacific wild salmon, turkey, eggs, and peanut butter.

Zinc: This mineral acts like EPA, in that it raises leptin levels. Oysters, red meat, poultry, beans, nuts, whole grains, fortified breakfast cereals, and dairy products are all good sources of zinc.

 

Source:  http://www.jillianmichaels.com

 

 

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Food Scientists Create The Perfect Meal

Food researchers at Britain’s Leatherhead Food Research have created the perfect meal.  Starting with over 4,000 foods, they scientifically eliminated the junk claimed to be healthy and ended up with approximately 200.  From there they created the most nutritious supper which includes a progression of foods containing the perfect nutrients.

Hors d’oeuvre:  The menu starts with a fresh and smoked salmon terrine, which contains Omega 3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which is good for the arteries, heart and brain, accompanied by a mixed leaf salad with an extra virgin olive oil dressing, helpful for maintaining healthy blood cholesterol levels.

Main Course:  A chicken casserole with lentils and mixed vegetables, a main dish that could make about 80 health claims, among them that it contains protein to grow muscle mass and lentils to reduce tiredness and improve mental performance.

Dessert:  The researchers recommend a blancmange, or pudding, made with yogurt with active cultures, topped with walnuts and a sugarless caramel-flavored sauce. Walnuts are known to improve elasticity of blood vessels, guar gum in the pudding would help to maintain normal blood cholesterol, and the yogurt is good for digestion.

Other recommendations from the food scientists at Leatherhead Food Research: A mixed berry shake that can serve as a meal replacement for dieters; a hot chocolate drink containing melatonin to aid in restful sleep; and charcoal tables to reduce gassiness.

Sources: http://www.dailymail.co.uk;  http://www.everydayhealth.com

 
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Posted by on June 26, 2012 in Health and Science

 

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Fish Oil vs. Krill Oil

A typical softgel

Health-wise, fish oil may no longer be the biggest fish in the sea (pun intended).

It’s well-known that fish oil, which is extracted from oily cold-water fish such as salmon, halibut and mackerel, has a load of health benefits, including lowering cholesterol, preventing blood clots and potentially offsetting health problems such as arthritis pain, menstrual pain and ADHD.

More and more scientists are getting excited about krill oil…supplement companies are advertising krill oil as superior to fish oil…and, as you may have noticed, more stores are selling krill oil. So the question is—is krill oil, which is extracted from very small shrimplike creatures, better for our health than fish oil?

I called an expert in oils—Bethany Thayer, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in Chicago. I think you’ll be intrigued by what she had to say…

BREAKING DOWN THE BENEFITS

Fish oil: When comparing any given amount of krill oil to fish oil, fish oil contains more (usually 33% to 50% more) omega-3 fatty acids known as EPA and DHA—these are antioxidants that protect cells from harmful changes caused by free radicals. Prices vary widely, but fish oil also tends to be about 30% to 60% cheaper than krill oil because fish oil can be derived from more sources. Since the dosing for fish oil and krill oil is typically the same, fish oil will leave less of a dent in your wallet.

Krill oil: Though there is only about one-half to two-thirds as much EPA and DHA in a given amount of krill oil, the EPA and DHA that is there is 20% to 30% more “bioavailable”—meaning that more of it is easily absorbed by our bodies because of its molecular makeup. That means that krill oil is digested better by humans, and, therefore, it is much less likely to cause the “fishy burps” and gross aftertaste known to affect some fish oil users. And unlike fish oil, krill oil contains the antioxidant astaxanthin, which crosses the blood-brain barrier, so it protects the brain and central nervous system from free radical damage even better than fish oil does.

Let’s see what the research shows…

HEAD-TO-HEAD STUDIES

One big challenge in comparing the two oils is that only a handful of studies on krill oil exist overall, but for fish oil, they number in the thousands! But here are the few studies that pit the two oils against each other…

  • According to a 2011 study published in Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, krill oil produced significantly greater declines in cholesterol and liver triglyceride levels than fish oil in rats. Winner: Krill oil.
  • According to a 2004 study from McGill University in Canada published in Alternative Medicine Review, krill oil was significantly more effective than fish oil at lower and equal doses at reducing blood levels of sugar, triglycerides and LDL “bad” cholesterol in people. Winner: Krill oil.
  • According to a 2003 study of women of reproductive age (age 33, on average) published in that same journal, krill oil supplements were more effective than fish oil at reducing breast tenderness, joint pain and emotional symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It’s worth noting, however, that two of the study authors worked for a krill oil manufacturer. Winner: Krill oil.
  • According to a 2010 study of 113 patients in the journal Lipids, blood levels of EPA and DHA increased just as significantly in those given either fish oil or krill oil over seven weeks, compared with those given a placebo. Winner: Too close to call.

GETTING HOOKED

These study results sure do make me think that krill oil is at least equal to, if not superior to, fish oil for general wellness. But Thayer said that more research needs to be done on krill oil to be able to declare it the true “winner,” since, as I mentioned earlier, only a handful of studies on krill oil exist overall.

When I asked whether it would be a good idea to take both fish oil and krill oil every day, she said that taking both in full doses could provide too much omega-3, which might lead to bleeding because these oils work as natural blood thinners. Her suggestion is to take either just one of them or to alternate.

Some warnings from Thayer before taking either krill oil or fish oil: Avoid taking either if you’re allergic to shellfish or seafood, because either might cause a reaction. If you’re pregnant or breast-feeding, talk to your doctor before taking either supplement, since their safety is unknown. You may also want to talk to your doctor first before taking either supplement if you’re on a blood thinner, because krill and fish oil are natural blood thinners and may cause an excess. Also ask your doctor whether it’s a good idea to avoid taking either in the week before surgery, because of the blood-thinning effect.

Source: Bethany Thayer, MS, RD, spokesperson, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Chicago, and director, wellness programs and strategies, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit.

 
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Posted by on June 9, 2012 in Health and Science

 

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Jillian Michaels: Foods That Burn Fat

‘Daily Dose With Jillian Michaels,’ Jillian highlights a few foods that can help dieters burn fat and possibly even boost metabolism. Here’s her list.

When you’re trying to lose weight, your daily calorie intake is like walking a tightrope: Consume too many calories, and you’ll hit a weight-loss plateau or even gain weight, consume too few calories, and your metabolism will stall. And once you slow your metabolism, getting back to your original rate of calorie burning can be tough, if not impossible.

Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to keep your metabolism on track and your body burning fat. Although there’s only one true way to increase your basal metabolic rate, which is the rate your body naturally burns calories (by increasing your body’s muscle mass), the foods you choose can help with the fat-burning process.

In a recent episode of Daily Dose With Jillian Michaels, Jillian and her co-host Janice reviewed a few of the top foods that can help burn fat, thanks to their antioxidants and hormone-regulating properties. Here’s a look at a few of Jillian’s favorite fat-burning foods.

Green tea. Studies have shown that regular consumption of green tea can moderately promote weight and fat loss. The secret to green tea’s fat-burning power is its catechins, the antioxidants in tea that combat free radicals and promote healthy cells. One cup of green tea contains between 50 to 100 milligrams of catechins, and most research shows that you must drink about five cups of green tea every day to see a fat-burning effect.

“It can’t hurt if you just sip it all day,” Jillian says. “It keeps you hydrated, and you get all those antioxidants and their cancer-fighting effects.”

Omega-3 fatty acids. A daily dose of omega-3 fatty acids, whether through a supplement or a natural source such as salmon, boosts weight-loss efforts when combined with exercise more than exercise alone, a study at the University of South Australia found. Researchers say this is because omega-3s are polyunsaturated fats that can boost fat oxidation, but that exercise is also required to reap this benefit. Studies have shown that just a few servings of fish per week can help with fat loss in lieu of supplementation.

Pistachio nuts. The simple act of swapping pistachios for your other favorite salty snacks has been shown to produce weight loss, with no additional effort required. A recent study also demonstrated that pistachios can improve symptoms of metabolic syndrome, such as blood pressure, insulin levels, and blood glucose levels.

“The other thing about pistachios is that it takes a while to open them up, and it’s going to slow your eating down,” Jillian says. “You’re not going to house a giant bag of nuts like you would chips.”

Pomegranate.  Both pomegranate and pomegranate oil have been shown to help burn fat in overweight people and reduce inflammation in the body, which can lower risk for heart disease and cancer. Some recent studies have even found that eating pomegranates may help prevent obesity and diabetes in both mice and humans.

“These little guys are anti-inflammatory and antioxidant bombs,” Jillian says, “which is great for your overall health.”

Last Updated: 04/19/2012
 

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Foods That Burn Belly Fat

Belly Button2

Believe it or not, your body actually doesn’t want to store fat. And the secret to lasting weight loss does not come down to complicated calorie-counting and weight-loss gimmicks. Instead, it’s about working with your body’s natural hunger and sleep rhythms to curb cravings, burn fat and send your energy levels soaring.

Research shows that our bodies’ inner eat-and-sleep clocks have been thrown completely out of whack, thanks to cues we send it all day with the wrong foods—and too much artificial light at night. The result: You’re caught in a “fat cycle”: a constant flow of hunger hormones that makes your cravings all but impossible to resist. But if you tune into your body’s natural eat and sleep schedules, you can actually—finally—say good-bye to your belly.

Certain foods can actually help you sleep better and help you lose weight on their own.  Eat these foods to sleep better, lose more weight, and melt your belly fat. Here’s how to get started!

 

Fish

Another day, another study about the benefits of eating fish—and for good reason. We know from animal studies that when your diet is deficient in omega-3s, the natural rhythms of your pineal gland—the pea-size gland in the center of your brain—are thrown off, leading to alterations in the production of melatonin, your sleep hormone. Animals with an omega-3 deficit don’t sleep during their usual rest periods—they’re up and spinning in their wheels the same way that humans with insomnia do. A diet rich in omega-3s, on the other hand, can boost heart health, lower your risk of dementia, and improved your moods. As for weight loss, many omega-3 carriers are rich in protein. And study after study confirms: Protein makes you feel full. You even burn more calories digesting protein than you do when you eat fats or carbs. How to get your dose: If you aren’t eating plenty of omega-rich foods—think sardines, salmon, halibut, walnuts, flax seeds, and dark leafy greens—you should be! If you aren’t getting enough easily, you can take fish- or flax seed-oil supplement.

 

Nuts

As if you needed another excuse to eat nuts, these fatty legumes are a great source of mood-boosting magnesium. Without enough magnesium in your body, the part of the brain that regulates melatonin is thrown off, disrupting your sleep. An uptick in magnesium is what tells animals it’s time to hibernate—for us, not having enough of it may play a role in seasonal affective disorder (SAD), the depression—and carb-craving—condition brought on by the low light of winter.

A 2010 study by USDA researchers, published in Magnesium Research, found that magnesium supplementation can help people who have a hard time sleeping to doze peacefully through the night. One group of the 100 tossers and turners over age 51 was given 320 milligrams of magnesium a day, while the other group was given a look-alike placebo. After 7 weeks, those taking the magnesium were sleeping better, and, as a bonus, had lower levels of dangerous inflammation, a rogue reaction by the immune system that is implicated in heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease.

How to get your dose: Foods rich in magnesium are also extremely weight loss friendly: protein-rich fish and nuts, lentils, soy and black beans, as well as fiber-rich grains like bran.

 

Milk

While the link between calcium and weight loss is still feeble (in some studies it promotes greater weight loss, in others it’s a wash), it turns out that milk may really do a body good when it comes to belly fat. A 2010 study by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham found that, among a group of more than 100 premenopausal women, fat was significantly reduced in those who consumed the most calcium-rich foods. In fact, for every 100 milligrams of calcium they consumed per day (that’s 1/2 cup of soft-serve frozen yogurt), they lost an inch of intra-abdominal fat—that’s the really bad stuff tucked in and around your internal organs that has been linked to higher rates of heart disease and cancer. Like magnesium, calcium can also help you sleep if you tend to be awakened by muscle soreness or cramps—the mineral, along with calcium, helps relax muscle nerves and fibers. How to get your dose: Dairy works, but there are other ways to get your calcium in as well, such as sardines, fortified orange juice, tofu, and dark leafy greens like kale and spinach.

 

Tart Cherries

Around bedtime, munch on a few tart Montmorency cherries. These cherries are one of a number of plant-based sources of melatonin, the sleep hormone. (Bananas and corn have it, too.) While there’s no evidence that they’ll help you nod off, studies have found that foods like these can raise melatonin levels in the body. Not only does melatonin help you sleep, but it’s a powerful antioxidant that can protect your cells from free radical damage, the kind that leads to cancer, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases. That should help you sleep easy. How to get your dose: Eat them whole! If you’re not a fan of cherries, drink the juice instead. In a recent study, people who drank 8 ounces of tart cherry juice in the morning and another 8 ounces in the evening for 2 weeks reported they slept more soundly.

Read more: http://www.prevention.com

 
 

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Fish: Wild or Farmed?

Fish farms

Fish farms (Photo credit: mattroyal)

These days, an increasing number of health-conscious consumers are choosing to eat fish for its heart-healthy benefits. The American Heart Association recommends that adults eat fish twice a week to meet their needs for omega-3 fatty acids, but how do you know if the fish you’re eating is beneficial?

There are many factors to consider when choosing which fish to eat, two of which include species (the type of fish, such as halibut, salmon, etc.) and source (where the fish was raised or caught). These aren’t simple decisions when you consider that the nutritional value of fish varies from species to species, and that each source carries a different potential for contamination, nutrition and environmental impact.

There are millions of fish species, but only a handful are popular for eating and even fewer are considered healthy choices. To choose which species to eat, consider first its fatty acid profile. Fish that live in dark, cold waters naturally contain higher levels of Omega-3’s. The fish richest in omega-3s are cold water fatty fish like salmon, rainbow trout, anchovies, sardines, bass, herring, and tuna.

Next, consider the source. There are two categories of sources of fish: farmed or wild. Each method has its own list of pros and cons, which every consumer will have to weigh to make the best decision for his or her own health and priorities.

Farmed Fish
Fish farming, or aquaculture, means that the fish are raised in floating net pens near the ocean shore. Another name for this method is “ocean raised.”

Pros of Farmed Fish

  • Price: Farmed fish are often cheaper and more readily available than wild fish.
  • Controlled diet: Some farmed fish can have higher levels of Omega-3 fatty acids than wild fish. This is because fish farmers can better control the diets of the fish they raise—making sure that their fish eat more feed that is converted into Omega-3s than a fish might normally eat in the wild. However, there is really no way for consumers to gauge the amount of Omega-3’s in one piece of fish versus another.
  • Ecology: When fish are farmed, there is a lower danger of overfishing (or depleting) the population of wild fish.

Cons of Farmed Fish

  • Contamination: Farmed fish usually contain more contaminants. Farmed fish are fed processed pellets, often made from processed anchovies, sardines and other small fish. Unfortunately, the types of fish used to make the pellets are usually caught in the polluted waters closer to shore and are often contaminated with industrial chemicals. As a result, farmed fish tends to have much higher levels of chemical contaminants that may cause cancer, memory problems, and neurobehavioral changes in children. Farmed salmon, for example, has been found to contain seven times more PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), dioxins and pesticides than wild salmon. Consumers can reduce the amount of contaminants in farmed salmon by almost half by grilling or broiling it so that the juices drip off, cooking it until the internal temperature reaches 175 degrees Fahrenheit and removing the skin before eating.
  • Antibiotics: Besides being prone to industrial contamination, farmed fish are more subject to disease, which spreads quickly throughout the entire pen. Sick fish can escape into surrounding open water and spread disease to wild fish populations. To control disease, farmed fish are often given antibiotics to prevent the whole group from becoming ill. Research has shown that farmed salmon, for example, are administered more antibiotics by weight than any other type of livestock.
  • Lower Omega-3’s: While farmed fish can be fed an enhanced diet to increase its Omega-3’s, there is no way for consumers to know whether one piece of fish contains more healthy fats than another. According to research in The American Journal of Clinical Nutritionfarmed salmon contains two or three times fewer Omega-3’s even though it contains more overall fat than wild salmon due to its grain-based diet. The same is is true for other popular farmed fish, such as catfish and tilapia.

Wild-Caught fish
Wild fish, in contrast to farmed, live in open waters and eat a natural diet. Fishermen catch wild fish on open waters, their natural habitat.

Pros of Wild Fish

  • Flavor: Many people prefer the taste of wild fish. Farmed fish do not have as much room to move as their wild counterparts, which reduces the amount of muscle they can develop and affects texture and taste.
  • Appearance: Wild salmon is naturally bright in color due to its food source (krill and other small sea creatures), while farmed salmon is grayish in color and dyes must be added to bring the flesh to an appealing shade.
  • Nutrition: Wild fish are usually healthier (higher in Omega-3s) and less contaminated than farmed fish.

Cons of Wild Fish

  • Overfishing: Most marine biologists agree that there will not be enough wild-captured fish available to meet the growing demand, and many fisheries do not catch wild fish in a sustainable way. Overfishing can deplete certain species of fish, which affects the ecosystem at large.
  • Price: Fresh wild fish is sometimes hard to find and usually more expensive than farmed fish.
  • Distance traveled: Unfortunately, not every fish lover lives on the coast or near a fishery. An Alaskan salmon, for example, must be shipped thousands of miles to reach a grocery store near you. The shipping of fish all over the world uses fossil fuels and pollutes the environment.

Although there are established health advantages to eating fatty fish, the risks of contaminants can’t be ignored either. All fish, wild or farmed, must adhere to FDA limits for PCB content and mercury levels, but some fish may measure in just below that cutoff. This content can build up in the body over time and cause problems later. However, many scientists believe that the heart-healthy benefits of consuming fish outweigh the risk, especially for older adults who may have already had a heart attack. But younger consumers, especially woman who may become pregnant and have a lifetime of exposure to these pollutants ahead of them, may wish to limit the amount of farmed fish they eat.

Only you can decide whether the cardiovascular benefits of fish outweigh the possible safety, nutritional or environmental issues associated with the type of fish you eat. If you eat fish regularly, ask about its source when ordering at a restaurant and read labels for origin when shopping at the supermarket.

No matter what type of fish or seafood you choose, SparkPeople Dietitian Becky Hand offers these top 5 tips for adults* to enjoy healthy fish:

  1. Make seafood a priority. Enjoy fish or seafood at least twice per week.
  2. Be adventurous. Try various types of seafood that you enjoy.
  3. Reel in fatty fish such as salmon and trout. These offer the most health benefits. If you enjoy lean fish such as tilapia and catfish, think about adding another serving of fatty fish to your weekly dinner menu to make up for it.
  4. Don’t skimp on lean fish. They’re healthy, too! Aside from being low in fat and calories, lean fish and shellfish are also loaded with micronutrients that are necessary for good health. For example, tilapia is high in selenium; clams are high in iron; and oysters are high in zinc.
  5. Prepare fish properly. Use low-fat cooking techniques such as broiling, baking, stir-frying, and sautéing. Avoid fried fish and highly processed fish foods such as fish sticks. Season with herbs, spices, marinades and rubs.

*These fish guidelines apply to adults who are not pregnant or breastfeeding. Seafood guidelines are different for children and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Editor’s Note: For more information on a variety of fish, sushi and seafood, including printable pocket-size reference guides, visit: www.MontereyBayAquarium.org or the Washington State Department of Health.

This article has been reviewed and approved by SparkPeople nutrition expert, Becky Hand, Licensed and Registered Dietitian.

 
 

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